In 1926, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Aaron Douglas, Bruce Nugent, Gwendolyn Bennett and John P. Davis created FIRE!! It is now a literary classic, and copies of the original are collector's items of legendary rarity. THE FIRE!! PRESS has published a faithful reproduction, which you may purchase for only $18.00 + $3.00 shipping.

Even before it was over, the Harlem Renaissance was the subject of varied interpretations and controversy. Dr. Long traces some of these critical discussions through the decades since then— cautioning us never to forget that the Renaissance was deeply rooted in the Black experience.

Abba Elethea's literary debut, FIRST FIRE, was published in 1970 in London by Paul Bremen as part of his prestigious Heritage Series. Lotus Press published Elethea's second collection of poetry, THE ANTIOCH SUITE-JAZZ, in 1980. Now THE FIRE!! PRESS offers Elethea's third book, SONGS FOR MY SISTERS, a stunning, lyrical celebration of the Aframerican woman.
From Other Publishers

GAY REBEL OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE: SELECTIONS FROM THE WORK OF RICHARD BRUCE NUGENT (Duke, 2002) is a gathering of Nugent's most important work. It includes "Smoke, Lilies and Jade," Nugent's contribution to FIRE!! (under the pseudonym Richard Bruce) as well as reproductions of many of his art works (Nugent was an artist as well as a writer). Also included are an extended biographical introduction by Thomas Wirth, excerpts from Nugent's novels GEISHA MAN and GENTLEMAN JIGGER, his transgressive "Bible Stories," and his sketches of Harlem personalities written under the auspices of the WPA.
GENTLEMAN JIGGER by Richard Bruce Nugent (Da Capo, 2008) is a roman a clef set in the Harlem Renaissance. Like Wallace Thurman's INFANTS OF THE SPRING, it records the high jinx at "Niggeratti Manor," where Nugent, Thurman, and several others lived. After the group disperses, Stuartt, the protagonist and stand-in for Nugent, moves to Greenwich Village and becomes sexually involved with a young hoodlum. Charming and audacious, Stuartt eventually seduces one of gangland's top bosses, before his friendships with the young heiress Wayne Traveller and Orini's "moll" Bebe set them all spinning in a whirlwind of jazz-age glamor and celebrity . . . that ends in an ironic denouement.